Early Red Haven


Early Red Haven peaches are the first variety of peaches that comes into season that we grow. They differ from Red Haven peaches because the fruit clings to the pit. Because of this they can be a bit of a pain to cut or can. Early Red Haven peaches are a yellow flesh peach that is very sweet with skin that peels off with ease.

Arrives: Early July

Departs: Late July

Red Haven


Red Haven peaches are the first free stone peach to come into season that we grow. They are similar to their earlier form but are now sweeter and have a pit that no longer clings to the fruit. Red Havens fair well for baking and canning, but are best for just eating. The skin of Red Havens peels very easily which is very helpful when canning or baking. They are orange/red in color and have a yellow stripe across the top near the stem. Red Havens ripen from the outside inward making them very soft near the skin and are easily bruised so they should never be squeezed. To check for ripeness just wait until the yellow streak across the top dulls and looks more orange.

Arrives: Late July

Departs: Late August

Donut


Donut peaches are the only variety of white flesh peaches that we grow. Because they are a white flesh peach they lack a tangy peachy flavor but make up for it in extreme sweetness. Sometimes they are called Saturn or UFO peaches. When all the green colors of the fruit turn white, the peach is ripe. Donut peaches have a small hole in them naturally and are very susceptible to going bad near that spot. They ripen faster than expected and have a very small, almost cherry sized, pit. The Donut peach has a white and firmer flesh than most peaches.

Arrives: Early August

Departs: Mid August

Rosa Hale


Rosa Hale peaches are the tangiest peach we grow. They are a free stone peach with a yellow flesh. Hales are renown for their ability to hold their shape when cooked or canned, and the Rosa Hale peach is no different. The tangy flavor of the Rosa Hale really comes through when cooked which makes it very good for baking. They typically them feel firmer than they really are. Instead of squeezing to see how ripe they are, it is better to check the yellow streak near the stem and wait for it to mellow out into an orange color.

Arrives: Mid-August

Departs: Late August

Suncrest


Suncrest peaches are a yellow flesh, free stone peach that is slightly firmer than the average yellow flesh peach. Their skin is also a little more yellow and the fruit is smaller overall. Suncrest peaches are similar in flavor to the Red Haven peach with plenty of sweetness and small tangy flavor. When under ripe, the Suncrest can appear to cling to the pit. When fully ripened however, the Suncrest is a free stone.

Arrives: Mid-August

Departs: Late August

J.H. Hale


J.H. Hale peaches are the best peach for canning and baking. They are similar to the Rosa Hale peach but are significantly larger and aren’t quite as tangy. We prune these trees a lot, producing a very large fruit. Like all Hales the J.H. Hale holds its shape well and has a great tangy flavor that comes through even more when baked, making it the best for baking. These late season peaches ripen form the inside outward like pears. Because of this they feel less ripe than they really are. The best way to tell how ripe they are is to look at the color of their yellow near the stem and wait for it to mellow out and turn more orange.

Arrives: Late August

Departs: Mid-September

Angelus


Angelus peaches are the final variety of peach to come into season for us. They are the largest and sweetest peach we grow. Angelus peaches are a softer peach that are great for eating but are not the best for canning or baking. These late season peaches ripen form the inside outward like pears. Because of this they feel less ripe than they really are. The best way to tell how ripe they are is to look at the color of their yellow near the stem and wait for it to mellow out and turn more orange. The Angelus and J.H. Hale peach are in season at the same time and can easily get mixed up. Typically the Angelus has more a striped look to it over the J.H. Hale.

Arrives: Late August

Departs: Mid-September

Organic vs. Non-Organic


Here at Martin Family Orchards we pride ourselves on growing our fruit in a way that we think is clean and responsible. We are not Organic certified but we do have a Global Gap certification. The Global Gap certification is a different certification process than Organic, through a different company, with different guidelines. Like Organic, Global Gap has restrictions on what kind of pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, and fertilizers you can use. As opposes to popular belief, Organic does not mean “no spray” especially with tree grown fruit. There are plenty of Organic certified pesticide that are commonly used, and we even use some of them. With Global Gap we think we can grow in a way that is clean, responsible, and produces some great fruit.

Peaches

We offer a wide variety of peaches. Tangy, soft, and sweet, these peaches are great for eating plain, baking and canning. Be on the look out for these in the late summer or early autumn.

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